Course Details – Ar

Course Descriptions for the Bachelor’s Degree (B)

Tawhid (monotheism) and its Divisions (B 101)

The course is an exploration of studies related to faith in Allah (swt), as well as the divisions of monotheism: the oneness of lordship, (the belief that Allah is the only creator), the oneness of worship, (the belief that Allah is the only God to be worshipped), and the oneness of names and attributes, (referring to Allah with the names and attributes that he has used to describe himself). This course also identifies the verbal and practical nullifiers of faith and clarifies the impact of creed (aqida) on thought and behavior.

The Pillars of Faith (B102)

This course explores the characteristics of faith, including: the fact that faith is expressed verbally as well as in actions, and that it tends to increase and decrease. This course also encompasses an exploration of the unseen, the angels, the holy books, the messengers, the day of judgment, decree and destiny (qada’ and qadar), and the rewards that Muslims reap in their lives, as a result of their faith in the unseen.

Texts dealing with Creed (Aqida) (B 103)

In this course, texts will be selected from the Quran, sunnah, and from various scholars’ quotations. These texts will comprise the most important issues related to Islamic creed, and they will be studied and analyzed in a methodology that is parallel to the sound and accurate understanding that the righteous predecessors possessed. Additionally, this course will attempt to correct erroneous belief systems that have spread in the Islamic community; by ensuring a sound understanding of these texts.

An Analytical Interpretation (Tafsir) of a selected Sura (B 104)

A sura, or an excerpt of one, will be selected from the Holy Quran. The sura will be explored in the following ways: the purpose of the revelation of the sura, its goals, and the most important issues that it deals with; while illuminating its significance in the reality of our everyday lives. Thereafter, an explanation and clarification of the sura will take place, in accordance with the methodology used in the analytical interpretation of the Holy Quran.

An Analytical Interpretation (Tafsir) of Selected Verses (B 105)

This course is a substitute for the course (tafsir of selected topics), wherein important topics will be selected, which address the reality and needs of Muslims. Then, verses will be sorted so that they are matched with the appropriate topics. Finally, an explanation, interpretation, and the significance of these verses will be provided.

Interpretation (Tafsir) of Legislating Verses (B106)

In this course, a range of verses from the Quran will be selected; these verses are ones that are linked to Islamic legislation. Credible sources in interpretation of the legislating verses will be used to examine the following: the meanings of the verses, their significance, as well as the Islamic legislation derived from these verses. A discussion will take place, which provides an explanation of the verses, as well as the significance of these verses in the related legislation. Finally, a brief overview will be provided, on the methodology that scholars have used to derive legislation from these verses.

Quranic Studies (B 107)

This course introduces the student to the Holy Quran, including: the compilation and writing of the Quran, the wisdom behind its revelation in small portions based on the historical periods and events, divisions of the Quran, its features, as well as attributes of the chapters of the Quran revealed in both Mecca and Madina. This course will also reveal the miraculous aspects of the Quran, as well as the unequivocal and equivocal verses. Students will also be briefly introduced to the key methods and schools of interpretation (tafsir), more specifically, opinion based interpretation and historical interpretation conducted by previous scholars.

Recitation and Rules of Recitation (Tajweed) (B 108)

This course aims to introduce students to the rules of recitation of the Holy Quran. Students will be trained in several rules of recitation such as: rules of the letters noon and meem, and the types of elongations (mudood). In addition to this, students will learn about the characteristics and proper pronunciation of letters, and how to correctly recite the Quran, while avoiding common mistakes.

Hadith Terminology (B 109)

This course introduces the student to the study of the honorable prophetic hadiths. Students will learn about the following concepts: the narration, an explanation of key terms used by hadith scholars, an understanding of the wording of hadith texts, and the sequence of narration of hadiths. Finally, students will learn to distinguish between accepted and rejected hadiths, and be able to identify the most important sources of prophetic hadiths.

An Explanation of Legislating Hadiths (B 110)

In this course, a select group of prophetic hadiths will be selected, these hadiths will be ones that Islamic legislation has been based upon, and their sources will be from Sahih of Imams Bukhari and Muslim. Students will be introduced to the narrators of these hadiths, which are among the companions (sahaba), and these hadiths will then be explained, and Islamic legislation will be derived from them.

Study and Analysis of Selected Hadiths (B 111)

In this course, hadiths will be selected for further study, these hadiths will be of importance and relevance in the lives of modern day Muslims; they will then be sorted into appropriate categories based on the topics they deal with. The hadiths and their significance will be explained, and students will be expected to memorize them to the best of their ability.

The Prophet’s Biography-Mecca (B 112)

This course provides students with an introduction to the biography of the Prophet (pbuh), from his birth through his journey to Madina. Events will be studied, analyzed, and lessons and advice will be derived from them. An attempt will be made to link these events to the current reality of Muslims, so that our journey through life may be safer, as we live in the shadows of his biography (pbuh); and work to achieve our goal of being true followers of the Prophet (pbuh).

The Prophet’s Biography- Madina (B 113)

This course is part of a series, and must be taken after completion of (The Prophet’s Biography-Mecca B112). This course provides students with an introduction to the biography of the Prophet (pbuh), beginning with his journey to Madina, and ending with his death. Events will be studied and analyzed, and lessons and advice will be derived from them. An attempt will be made to link these events to the current reality of Muslims, so that our journey through life may be safer, as we live in the shadows of his biography (pbuh); and work to achieve our goal of being true followers of the Prophet (pbuh).

An Introduction to Foundations of Fiqh (B114)

This course introduces the student to the foundations of fiqh, with a brief introduction to its origins; as well as the most prominent contributing scholars, and the most important schools and curricula. This course will also shed light on the importance fiqh in making informed judgments (ijtihad), and the derivation of Islamic legislation. Additionally, this course encompasses a study of the most important divisions of fiqh such as: complete evidence, which includes: the quran and sunnah, consensus, and striking comparisons. Students will also learn about: general and specific meanings, obstacles to qualifications, informed judgment, and imitation.

Applications of the Fundamental Rules (B 115)

This course explores the application of fundamental fiqh rules, as well as the partial rules which are derived from them. Also included, is a study of the effects of the fundamental fiqh rules on the regulation and derivation of partial legislation. Students will learn how differing opinions in the fundamental fiqh rules affect disagreements among fiqh scholars. Finally, this course will identify the exceptions that do not fall under these rules.

The Manners of Disagreeing in Islam (B 116)

This course aims to familiarize the student with the proper manners used in dealing with those who possess differing opinions and informed judgements (ijtihad), including scholars and sheikhs, and especially concerning controversial issues. Additionally, students will be informed of the reasons that necessitate differences in opinion among Muslims, including the two main reasons: differences in textual evidence, and significance. Finally, various situations will be posed, which highlight the manners that scholars employed when interacting with their Sheikhs, peers, and those who possess different opinions.

Legislation Relating to Purification and Prayer (B 117)

This course includes a study of the Islamic legislation related to purification and prayer, such as: rules governing the water source, familiarity with the impurities (najasat) that should be avoided by Muslims, and the rules, requirements, recommendations, and pillars of prayer, as well as rules regarding Jumuaa, Eid, and Janaza prayers. A basic explanation will be provided on the points of disagreement between the scholars, concerning prayer; and students will learn how to reconcile conflicting evidence.

Rules Governing Alms (Zakah), Fasting, and Hajj (B 118)

This course explores the rules related to alms, fasting, and Hajj (pilgrimage). Key topics related to each of them will be covered in this course, as outlined below: -Alms: how to identify funds that alms apply to, calculation of alms, and how it must be dispersed. -Fasting: the guidelines of fasting and its nullifiers. -Hajj: Guidelines and necessities related to hajj, as well the different kinds of hajj. Additionally, a brief overview will be provided, of several points of disagreement between scholars (related to alms, fasting, and hajj); as well as how to reconcile conflicting evidence.

Fiqh of Financial Transactions (B 119)

This course includes a comprehensive study of the legislation related to sales, including: leans, sponsorship, conditional payment, money transfers, trusts, forcing, gambling, and others. Additionally, the legislation and features related to rent and trusts will be addressed. A brief overview will be provided, of the most prominent disagreements among scholars (concerning financial transactions), as well as their evidence, and how to reconcile conflicting evidence.

Fiqh of Family Issues (B 120)

This course introduces Islamic legislation related to family issues such as: marriage, divorce, khul’ (woman-initiated divorce), and child custody. Students will learn about scholars’ different views when it comes to several family issues, and will learn how to choose among different scholarly opinions, and reconcile conflicting evidence. This course will also shed light on the manners that should govern married life, the rights of both spouses, children, and relatives. Finally, this course highlights the dynamics of family relations within the Muslim community.

Inheritance (B 122)

This course introduces students to the importance of this knowledge in people’s lives, and that it is the first knowledge that is taken back from Earth, on the Day of Judgment. Students will study its legislation and classifications, types of inheritance, types of heirs, how to divide inheritances, and the rules of transferring the inheritance among individuals within the rules of inheritance (almunasakhat). Students will also be trained in calculating issues of inheritance, and will learn about the distinguished approach that Islam employs in the division of inheritance, and how this approach provides justice to all people. Finally, this course will debunk the suspicions that misguided people have aroused surrounding inheritance.

Criminal Legislation in Islam (B 123)

This course introduces Islamic legislation related to felonies and crimes and the applicable felony penal code and punishment. Students will be given a brief overview of the key points of disagreement among the scholars and their evidence; and students will learn to reconcile conflicting evidence. This course also reveals suspicions that have been raised surrounding Islamic felony penal code, refutes them, and sheds light on the legislators’ wisdom in rulings, as well as the role of the Islamic felony penal code in the establishment of a safe and stable Muslim society.

Islamic Educational Thought (B 124)

This course provides an understanding of Islamic educational thought, its characteristics and features, and most important institutions, with an introduction to some of its prominent figures, as well as the causes behind its weaknesses and stagnation in certain periods of time. This course also reflects the reality of Islamic educational thought, in a time when those at odds with Islam have joined efforts in the secularization of thought and the intellectual realm, within the Muslim world. As a result, our thought has become more westernized, as the borrowing from western thought has been ever-increasing. The Muslim community (ummah) has become hostage to the intruding educational policies, which foreign to the core of Islam, its creed, and legislation.

Islamic Educational Institutions (B 125)

This course aims to introduce students to the educational institutions in Islam. Various institutions will be selected, both historical and modern, whether they be: mosques, schools, universities, or other types of institutions. This course will highlight their goals, the nature of their curricula, and their role in promoting educational thought and expanding the horizons of Islamic knowledge. Finally, a brief overview will be provided, of the most important internal and external challenges that these institutions have faced.

Educational Strategies and Methods (B 126)

This course introduces students to key terminology that will be used throughout the course. Students will learn about the most important strategies and methods used within historical and modern Islamic educational institutions, as well as outside of these institutions. These strategies and methods will be evaluated and corrected in light of Islamic educational thought. Finally, this course will shed light on the practical role that these strategies and methods play in our educational institutions; as well as the extent to which they have been affected by western curricula; in light of the ever expanding borrowing of intellectual thought and westernization.

Islamic Economics (B 127)

This course illustrates the Islamic understanding of economics; its foundations, significance, and characteristics. Islamic Economics is then compared to contemporary economic approaches. This course also explores Islamic legislation, and Islam’s position with regards to: the provisions of fiscal contracts, bank transactions, credit cards, and modern investment methods. Emphasis will be placed on Islamic alternatives to the way financial transactions are currently handled.

An Understanding of Following and Heretical Innovation (B 128)

This course provides the student with an understanding of following and heretical innovation in light of Islamic educational thought, including: the truth about following and heretical innovation, related legislation, and the difference between following and imitation. This course will illustrate the type of environment which encourages the growth of heretical innovation. Additionally, students will learn about the effect of the deviation of scholars, ignorance among the masses, and the spread of heretical innovation among people. Finally, this course will identify the most effective strategies and methods for promoting the sunnah and exterminating heretical innovation.

Principles of Dawah (Invitation to Understanding Islam) (B 129)

This course introduces Islamic dawah, its origins, characteristics, and guidelines related to it, as well as methods and strategies that fulfill its goals and objectives. The pillars of dawah will also be introduced, the most important being:. (the dawah, the inviter, the invited, and the subject of dawah). Additionally, students will learn about the categories of people invited, and a definition of the system of hisbah (advocating for virtue and the denouncement of evil); and its legitimacy and appropriate setting.

The Divine Laws (B 130)

This course defines the divine laws of God, and the general law which governs all creatures in this world. Additionally, students will learn of the types of divine laws: universal, Islamic (natural and supernatural), as well as the resulting consequences in this life and the hereafter. This course will also explain Allah’s laws in the causes and causatives, the law of reasoning, the relationship between the divine laws, and decree and destiny (qada’ and qadar), and whether a person has choice, or is bound by fate (tasyir and takhyir); any confusions or problems in understanding this paradigm will be cleared up. This course also includes an exploration of applications from the Book and the sunnah.

A Comparison of Religions (B 131)

This course introduces the student to divine religions, as well as most man-made religions, and compares these religions to Islam. The goal of this course is to provide students with the information they need to participate in interfaith dialogues, and to invite people to Allah’s religion.

Groups & Schools of Thoughts (B 132)

This course will engage students in a discourse about the establishment of the most prominent groups and schools of thought; their curricula, and impact on Muslim society through the ages. Emphasis will be placed on the curriculum of the Sunnah and Jama’a*, which best represent moderation in both thought and conduct. *Sunnah and jama’a: those who act upon, and call people to the Book of Allah and the Sunnah of His Messenger (pbuh).

The Prophets’ Stories (B 133)

This course aims to introduce students to the prophets and messengers, and will shed light on their infallibility. Additionally, this course will concentrate on ulil ‘azim (the foremost in resoluteness among the prophets and messengers), students will study the most prominent stories from their lives, their missions; and attempt to extract lessons and advice from them.

The Prophets’ Stories (B 133)

This course aims to introduce students to the prophets and messengers, and will shed light on their infallibility. Additionally, this course will concentrate on ulil ‘azim (the foremost in resoluteness among the prophets and messengers), students will study the most prominent stories from their lives, their missions; and attempt to extract lessons and advice from them.

The History of the Rightly-Guided Caliphs (B 134)

This course encompasses the study of the biographies of the Caliphs (may Allah be pleased with them), and their role in the sustaining the pillars of the Islamic state after the death of The Prophet (pbuh). This will include a study of: the most important conquests of their era, and their method in organizing the state’s affairs, including the administrative, financial, and military branches. This course also deals with the trials and tribulations (fitna) and events of their time; and the resulting impact on the Muslim community (ummah), as well as the effects that have lived on to this today.

Research Methods (B135)

This course aims to introduce students to scientific research, including: its features, divisions and types, methodology of research, and characteristics of the researcher. This course will also illustrate the most important scientific steps involved in the preparation of scientific research, including: the selection of a topic, creation of a research plan, collection of material, effective articulation, how to write the introduction and conclusion, as well as the correct usage of sources and references, and creation of the indexes.

Khitaba (delivery of sermons) and Presentation (B 136)

This course provides an introduction on how to present sermons and khutbas. Including: the manners employed in the delivery of sermons, the innate and acquired characteristics of the khatib (speaker), pitfalls the khatib should avoid, how to prepare a khutba, the types of khutbas, the appropriate style of presentation, a knowledge of the fiqh rules and the prophet (pbuh)’s guidance related to the Friday and Eid khutbas. Finally, students will study selected khutbas, and receive practical training in the delivery of sermons.

Students who are applying for a Bachelor degree in English language must take Arabic Level 1,2,3,4.

  • Arabic Level 1 (AL 101)
  • Arabic Level 2 (AL 102)
  • Arabic Level 3 (AL 103)
  • Arabic Level 4 (AL 104)
Students who are applying for a Bachelor degree in Arabic language must take the following courses:
Nahw & Sarf (B 137)

In this course students will study the parts of speech including: the mabni, muarab, marfooat alasma’ such as almubtada’ walkhabar, the subject and substitute of the subject, the rules of nawasikh (superseding), conditions which cause the name to be mansoob, kinds of almafa’eel, exceptions, adverbs, distinguished, kinds of jarr by addition or by jarr letters which will be identified, as well as the different uses of these letters. Also, this course teaches the scale of sarf, almujarad and almazeed, almuta’adi wallazim, the two kinds of verbs that reflect known and unknown subjects, tasgheer, nasab (lineage), ali’lal (verbs that contain vowels), and ibdal (replacement).

Applications in Nahw & Sarf (B 138)

Students will be trained in i’rab, the rhyme of Arabic words, and will be trained in tracing the origins of Arabic words through I’rab of selected suras form the Holy Quran, prophetic hadiths, and literary texts. In order for this course to be a practical application of what has been studied in the course on Arabic Grammar, students will engage in a comprehensive study of i’rab, based on the modern method of i’rab that is currently used.

Rhetoric (B 139)

This course includes an extensive study of rhetoric, and its three divisions: the bayan (explanation), ma’ani (the meanings), and the badi’ (magnificent). Students will study comparison, borrowing, aliases and related issues, and will focus on the characteristics of styles, the secrets of original Arabic expression, and knowledge of the systems and regulations that are applicable to speech in the present time. Finally, students will study badi’ enhancers such as: saja’ (assonance), jinas (alliteration), tawria, and more.

Islamic Literature (B 140)

This course is an introduction to Islamic literature, and illustrates its unique characteristics and features which distinguish it from pre-Islamic literature, and other schools of literature. Also included, is an exploration of the impact of the Holy Quran and prophetic hadith on literature, and Islam’s position on poetry and poets. This course also includes a brief study of the rhyme scheme of poems, as well as the various literary periods. Students will be introduced to the most prominent poets whose writing contain Islamic undertones, and then engage in a study of selected excerpts of their poetry. Lastly, students will study samples of Islamic nathir (freestyle) literature.